Sony Announces the Live Android Phone for Music Lovers

Sony Ericsson has had an interesting string of handsets lately. From the super slim Arc, to the slide away gaming Play, Sony seems to be one of the few manufacturer doing a good job standing out from the Android pack. The latest phone from the Sony camp is aimed at music lovers and is called the “Live.” The handset ships with native applications for Sony’s Quriosity music program and a powerful equalizer.

Sony Ericsson Live 
Specs
The Sony Ericsson Xperia Live is a slimmed down handset running Android 2.3 Gingerbread. It features a 3.2-inch WVGA capacitive touch screen that’s bright and vivid, while still small enough to allow a good form factor. Under the hood is a 1GHz processor, (likely a Snapdragon) and 312MBs of RAM. It’s not exactly on super phone levels, but that is more than enough power to ensure a snappy Android experience and run any app currently available. The phone features tri-band 3G supports and will be able to roam on more or less any GSM network. In addition, the phone also ships with Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and a dedicated GPS for navigation.
Availability
The Live is slated for a Q4 release and while there is no official word on price just yet, it’s clearly being marketed as a mid-ranged device. Even at the standard price of $450 with a 32GB microSD card included in the price, it may prove to be a compelling option for music lovers who want a decent smartphone. Press release provided below:

Full Press Release Text:

Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman™ delivers unique social music experience for smartphones
22 August 2011
Smartphone with Walkman™ on the latest Android platform (Gingerbread 2.3)
Unique Facebook™ integration enables instant music and media sharing
Content services from Sony provide access to the latest music and video titles
22 August 2011, London, UK – Sony Ericsson today announced Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman™, an Android smartphone that delivers a unique social music experience. A dedicated Walkman™ hardware button provides instant access to the music player and consumers can also like, share and discover content through a deep Facebook™ integration. The infinite button lets the consumer explore even more and the *Qriocity service from Sony provides music and video content for the consumer to enjoy.
With attractive curved design, a glossy finish and a mineral glass display, the phone has a 3.2" screen and a powerful 1Ghz processor. A front facing camera is enabled for Skype video calling, while a 5MP AF camera can capture 720p HD video recording. *Sony’s xLOUD™ enhances audio output, while the latest Android platform for smartphones (Gingerbread 2.3) provides access to over 250,000 applications on the Android Market™.
Nikolaus Scheurer, Head of Product Marketing, Sony Ericsson said: "Consumers want smartphones to deliver a rich and social entertainment experience. Rather than a one dimensional music experience, they want instant and seamless access to new content, combined with the ability to share and connect with their friends. The Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman™ provides exactly this, in a powerful package with great style."
A perfect combination of social networking and music entertainment:
Deep Facebook™ integration: Allows users to instantly access Facebook through the most used areas of the phone such as the picture gallery, music player, phonebook and calendar.
Media Discovery Application: A dynamic application placing the world of music and videos at consumer’s fingertips including Facebook™ recommendations from their friends.
Infinite button: Tapping it within the media player enables consumers to have instant access to new content about their favourite artist, such as music videos, artist information and lyrics search.
Qriocity music and video content services from Sony: Consumers can access millions of songs from all major labels and watch thousands of movies from all major studios. Only Sony Ericsson Android smartphones provide consumers with unique access to the entertainment services from *Sony.
*Sony’s xLOUD™ technology: Enhances audio output of the inbuilt speakers at high levels.
TrackID™: Identifies the music track you are listening to within the FM radio and music player. The track can then instantly be shared or downloaded.
Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman™ will be available globally in selected markets from Q4 2011.
For full details all products news, please visit the press room and the product blog:
http://www.sonyericsson.com/cws/corporate/press/pressreleases/latestnews
http://blogs.sonyericsson.com/products/
Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman™ at a glance.
*Please note that all services mentioned may not be available in every market.
Colours
Black and White
Facts
Size: 56.5 x 106 x 14.2 mm
Weight: 115 g
Camera
5 megapixel camera
8x digital zoom
Auto focus
Face detection
Flash/Photo light
Flash/Photo flash
Flash/LED
Front-facing camera (VGA)
Geo tagging
HD video recording (720p)
Image stabiliser
Red-eye reduction
Scene detection
Self-timer
Send to web
Smile detection
Touch capture
Touch focus
Video light
Video recording
Music
Album art
Bluetooth™ stereo (A2DP)
Music tones (MP3/AAC)
PlayNow™ service
Stereo speakers
TrackID™ music recognition
Walkman™ player
xLOUD™
Internet
Android Market™
Bookmarks
Google™ search
Google Voice™ Search
NeoReader™ barcode scanner
Pan & zoom
Web browser (WebKit)
Communication
Call list
Conference calls
Facebook™ application
Google Talk™
Polyphonic ringtones
Skype
Sony Ericsson Timescape™
Speakerphone
Twitter™ (Timescape™ integration)
Vibrating alert
Video chat ready
Messaging
Conversations
Email
Google Mail™
Handwriting recognition
Instant messaging
Multimedia messaging (MMS)
Predictive text input
Sound recorder
Text messaging (SMS)
Type & Send widget
Design
Auto rotation
Four-corner Home screen
Keyboard (on-screen, 12-key)
Keyboard (on-screen, QWERTY)
Live wallpaper
Picture wallpaper
Touch screen
Entertainment
3D games
Media browser
Radio (FM radio with RDS)
Video streaming
Video viewing
YouTube™
Organiser
Alarm clock
Calculator
Calendar
Document readers
Emanual
Flight mode
Google Calendar™
Google Gallery 3D™
Infinite button
Phonebook
Setup guide
Event
Timer
Widget manager
Connectivity
3.5 mm audio jack
aGPS
Bluetooth™ technology
DLNA Certified™
Google Latitude™
Google Maps™ for Mobile
Google Maps™ with Street View
Media Transfer Protocol support
Micro USB support
Modem
Native USB tethering
Synchronisation via Facebook™
Synchronisation via Google™ Sync
Synchronisation via Sony Ericsson Sync
Synchronisation with computer
Synchronisation via Microsoft® Exchange ActiveSync®
Synchronisation: Microsoft® Exchange ActiveSync® via Moxier client
USB mass storage
USB High speed 2.0 support
USB support
Wi-Fi™
Wi-Fi™ Hotspot functionality
Wisepilot™ turn-by-turn navigation
Display
3.2 inches
16,777,216 colour TFT
480 x 320 pixels
Capacitive touchscreen (multi-touch)
Scratch-resistant
Memory
Phone memory (user-free): Up to 320MB
Memory card support: microSD™, up to 32GB
Battery life
Talk time GSM/GPRS: Up to 14 hrs 15 min*
Standby time GSM/GPRS: Up to 600 hrs*
Talk time UMTS: Up to 6 hrs 42 min*
Standby time UMTS: Up to 850 hrs*
Music listening time: Up to 17 hrs 30 min
Video listening time: Up to 6 hrs 30 min
*According to GSM Association Battery Life Measurement Technique. Battery performance may vary depending on network conditions and configurations, and phone usage.
Networks
UMTS HSPA 850 (Band V), 1900 (Band II), 2100 (Band I)
GSM GPRS/EDGE 850, 900, 1800, 1900
UMTS HSPA 900 (Band VIII), 2100 (Band I)
GSM GPRS/EDGE 850, 900, 1800, 1900
In the kit
Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman™
1200 mAh battery
stereo headset
2GB microSD™ memory card
Charger
micro USB cable for charging
synchronisation and file transfer
user documentation

Bio(About the Author): Maria Rainier is a freelance writer and recent graduate of Elon University. She is currently a resident blogger at online degrees, where recently she’s been interested in advanced start nutrition programs and blogging about student life. In her spare time, she enjoys square-foot gardening, swimming, and avoiding her laptop.

Facebook era to an END?

An online poll carried out by The Christian Post  aimed at measuring just how Google+ is faring against rival Facebook found that the majority of voters believe both companies will coexist.

image

The unofficial poll, in which almost 2,000 people participated, gave voters the following three options to choose from:

1. Google+ Will Dethrone Facebook
2. Google+ Will Lose to Facebook
3. Google+ Will Coexist with Facebook, Just Like Coke and Pepsi

The votes proved to be favorable for “Google+ dethroning Facebook,” with 36.5 percent of the votes (702 votes), over “Google+ losing to Facebook,” 16.6 percent of the votes (319 votes). But the majority, 46.9 percent of the votes (903 votes) believe that both companies will co-exist in rivalry the same way Coca-Cola and Pepsi have battled for dominion until the present.

No duplication of votes was allowed in a poll that blocked identical IP addresses from voting twice. And although the poll’s accuracy may certainly be questioned due to a limited number of votes casted and various other factors, the results of two additional polls conducted revealed consistent in favorable results for Google+.

The three polls consisted of almost 3,500 votes and are still open to any user who wants to weigh his/her opinion against the general online public.

image: http://pinoytutorial.com/

Internet-Connected Devices – Need or Necessity?

Having access to the mobile internet is becoming an essential part of daily life for most of us, but thanks to a dizzying array of different devices for getting connected, it can be tricky deciding on the best one to use.

ipad2_smartcoverflow

Of course, the smartphone has become a popular choice for many people on the go because many of the latest handsets have many of the same features found on a traditional computer, but all squeezed into a handy pocket-sized powerhouse. The only potential downside to all this is that screens and keyboards are often similarly squashed. So, for anyone who wants to be productive on the move then it’s often a better idea to investigate something a little more substantial.

Laptops have come a long way in recent years and often have formidable specifications while they’re also a lot less bulky than they used to be. Better still is the netbook, which is the shrunken version of the same thing, although again, the downside with these is that keyboard and screen real estate can be less impressive than the traditional laptop. Nevertheless, they’re a good bet if you want a bit of a compromise between productivity and portability.

The growing range of tablet computers is perhaps where things get most interesting. Apple started it all with the iPad, which has now been superseded by the iPad 2 and this is a fantastic device for accessing the internet while you’re on the go. A virtual keyboard, superior web browsing and email facilities plus Wi-Fi and/or 3G means that you can do pretty much everything you’d do on a laptop or netbook, but it’s even more convenient.

Failing that, try one of the many rival tablets that have appeared on the scene as they’re all pretty good, but beware some of the really cheap models at the bottom end of the market. The great thing about tablets is that they’re a little like smartphones in that you can choose an operating system that you get on with, while also enjoying great connectivity, without the bulk. Better still, that extra bit of screen space makes them a good bet for watching movies and suchlike.

Ultimately, if you spend time checking out the comparison websites and shopping around then there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to get a couple of these devices, such as a smartphone and tablet, within one deal. They do exist, and if you need to do a little bit of multitasking from time to time then this may be the best way to do it.

This post was contributed by Rob Clymo, who writes on behalf of www.broadbandgenie.co.uk, helping you find the best laptop deals and options for the latest in netbooks, tablets and smartphones.

Future of Food Printers

Some of you may be confused by the title… what do printers have anything to do with the future of food? Well at the moment, not much. But what if we could go to a little machine in your kitchen and print food at your own will, as seen in many sci-fi movies and TV shows.

Food Printers

Well let me start by telling you what technology already exists. A number of scientific companies are developing various bio-technologies that would allow tissue and organs to be printed on demand. Organovo is one of these companies, they have developed three-dimensional technology to create tissue for surgical applications. There’s a lot of research going on by other companies as well including Invetech, the US military, the Wake Forest Institute, etc. This in its self is and will be an amazing advancement… being able to print skin and organs for medical and surgical use would truly change the world.

Although the possible advancement that I am talking to you about today would change things just as much. If we can print biological human cells and for organs and skin, then surely printing meat as a food product would be the next progression. Imagine being able to print a huge steak from a cartridge filled with beef cells! I’m no scientist but I’m sure this would be possible, and if so then the possibilities would be endless. Obviously at the moment the funding and concentration is on developing this technology for medical purposes, but maybe in the not so distant future you’ll go into your very small kitchen that consists of an odd printer like device that prints some nice chicken meat, cooks it and then dresses it for you!

CartridgeExpress is the web developer for a shop that sells printer cartridges online. Follow them on twitter.

The Social Network’s real face is Campus Network

Adam Goldberg.

 

Adam GoldbergIn is the real face of the Social Network movie. TheSocial Network moivie seems to be about Facebook.  But it’s not about Facebook. It’s about another site, Campus Network, and its founder, Adam Goldberg, a guy who came within arm’s reach of a multibillion-dollar idea that ultimately slipped his grasp.

 

As The Social Network dramatizes, Mark Zuckerberg founded Facebook after allegedly backing out of a commitment to work on another networking site, Harvard Connection. Lawsuits ensued, and Zuckerberg ended up shelling out tens of millions of dollars in a settlement with his one-time partners. What the film doesn’t mention are all the other college social networks that Facebook shoved aside as it expanded across the country. Of those sites, perhaps the greatest threat to Facebook’s dominance was Campus Network, then called CU Community after Columbia University, where it was founded.

"If you talk to Mark, he’ll be the first to tell you he thought CU Community was the biggest competition that Facebook ever had," says Goldberg, now 26 years old and living in New York City. While I was unable to confirm that Zuckerberg agrees with this statement—the Facebook CEO and the company’s PR reps didn’t respond to requests for an interview—it is true that Facebook and CU Community were running neck and neck for a brief moment in Internet history. Facebook had Harvard, CU Community had Columbia, and both were mulling plans for expansion. Only one site would survive. It wasn’t Adam Goldberg’s.

Goldberg got the idea for Campus Network in 2003, during his freshman year at Columbia’s school of engineering. As president of his class, he heard a lot of complaints about the university’s lack of community spirit. Over the summer, he wrote a simple script for a social network for engineering students. The site let users share personal information, post photos, write journal entries, and comment on one another’s posts. In just a few weeks, Goldberg says, three-quarters of engineering students had profiles. Over winter break, he rebranded the site CU Community and opened the site to all undergraduates in January. Goldberg says that most Columbia students signed up in just over a month.

On Feb. 4, Facebook launched. "At first I was like, Oh my God, they copied my Web site," says Goldberg. Unlike Zuckerberg’s Harvard Connection adversaries, however, the CU Community founder quickly changed his mind. "I saw it was totally different. It had an emphasis on directory functionality, less emphasis on sharing. I didn’t think there was that much competition."

As of early 2004, Goldberg’s social network was a lot more advanced than Mark Zuckerberg’s. The first incarnation of Facebook—known as The Facebook back then—let users post a photo and basic biographical information. It let them "friend" and "poke" each other. But that was about it. Fancier tools like photo sharing and Groups and the Wall didn’t come till later. Meanwhile, CU Community already had blogging and cross-profile commenting. Facebook’s simplicity and the fact that it was available only to Harvard students made it easy for Goldberg to dismiss. "We were the Columbia community, they were Harvard," he says.

Click image to expand.

 

The illusion of safety crumbled a month later when Facebook opened its doors to students at Stanford, Yale, and Columbia. While Facebook grew exponentially at Harvard and Stanford, growth was slower at Columbia—in part, says Goldberg, because CU Community was already so entrenched. Some Columbia students launched a campaign to "Google bomb" Facebook by linking the search term "cucommunity ripoff" to TheFacebook.com and "worthless safety school" to Harvard.edu. The Columbia Spectator called the effort "marginally successful." (I wrote for the Spectator at the time.) Despite this online agitprop, Facebook continued to grow. That summer, it overtook CU Community as the most popular social network on campus.

That spring, Goldberg started instant messaging with Mark Zuckerberg. In March, he met with Zuckerberg and Sean Parker, the Napster co-founder and early Facebook investor, at a Starbucks on 96th Street. According to Goldberg, Parker tried to persuade Zuckerberg to acquire CU Community. Zuckerberg didn’t tip his hand, but Goldberg says they kept in touch. In June, he says, Zuckerberg invited him to Palo Alto, Calif., where the Facebook crew had moved to work on the site. Goldberg flew out and stayed with Zuckerberg and pals for two weeks. "I think we went to one Stanford party," he says. There was "no crazy partying or drinking," Goldberg says, despite what The Social Network may suggest.

The invitation to come to Palo Alto was basically a job offer, says Goldberg. "They didn’t give me a clear salary and working terms. It was, Come out here and work with us." He remembers that Zuckerberg even offered to pay for Goldberg’s flight.

Goldberg said no, thanks. "I really believed that Campus Network was a better product," he says. He spent the summer of 2004 coding a new site, rebranded it Campus Network, and launched it at five other schools in September. But Facebook was expanding, too. "We made a strategic decision to go after Big 12 schools," says Wayne Ting, who ran business and legal operations for Campus Network. "But when we went to the Big 12, Facebook immediately went to the Big 12, too. They were clearly monitoring our activity."